Propeller

I don’t need
their winter curse
from a time gone by
even silence
turns on its rails
staying clear
of the painters easel
so it goes the windows
of the school
the oldest of all griefs
harder than boxwood

a nectarine
and voices
clear as water
with a torn piece
leaf by leaf
woven into bluish lenses
and the gritty white ruins
of an Oklahoma prison
that held Clyde Barrow
that nobody visits

from these animal bones
children live in private gardens
laughing and naked
running with red hands

I’m guessing the solitude
shuffles where the boy
defecates in the dirt
under the porch
his bronze body
never again less
incurable than now

some are snags
bare as chalk
some conspire
to make noises among others
full of hooks and ministers
a flash of criminals

where a girl is walking
a fragrance of hips
smoothes out time
lines and ruts
cut into her school desk
far from profound
say things will remain
all the numbers and letters
stretch out beyond the heat plant
towards the winery
like copper trees at dawn

no balm in gilead
just a rollaboard suitcase
in the carousel
at the airport terminal
our secret decay
fills the gaps
in the paraphrase of faces
before words can

maybe Charles Lindbergh’s
only mistake was
he wasn’t a mistake
or Michelangelo
only a boy
carelessly bronzed
over time

3 responses to “Propeller

  1. I love the crafted smoothness of this poem. The slow bronzing over of our past experiences into eloquent silences, decaying before we can understand them very well, make stories and art of them. They were more than we knew then, and now.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Craig Brandis (aka Burl Whitman)

      A careful read is a great gift. I never see things clearly until a skilled reader helps me to do so. Thank you bro. They were more than we knew and only come into soft focus when we see them receding from us.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s